Tag: sustainability

The Ways We Work: Part 3, Working Solutions to Unsustainable Academia

This post by Rachel Webb Jekanowski, Anne Pasek, and Kate Elliott (with additional insights and contributions from Kaitlin Blanchard) is the final post in a three-part series on the relationship between climate change and university working cultures. So far in this series we’ve discussed the role extractive energy plays in the contemporary academy, both in the fossil energy undergirding academic...

The Ways We Work: Part 2, Extractivism in the University

This post by Rachel Webb Jekanowski, Anne Pasek, and Kate Elliott (with additional insights and contributions from Kaitlin Blanchard) is the second of a three-part series on the relationship between climate change and university working cultures. In the first post of our series, we outlined several ways that fossil energy can be found in the academy, ranging from financial investments...

On Sustainability and Solidarity

This post is part of a series on Sustainable Academia—in cooperation with the Next Generation Action Team (NEXTGATe) of the European Society for Environmental History—in which contributors reflect on the conditions of historians in Europe and beyond (especially those in early career stages), introduce visions for the field, and suggest concrete action in order to build more inclusive and supportive academic environments.

The Ways We Work: Part 1, Oily Entanglements

This three-part series of posts on “The Ways We Work” will explore the intersections of climate-informed research and the labour practices that undergird contemporary universities, with a particular focus on North America. We hope it serves as an invitation to the field of environmental history to think about sustainability as both a methodological question and one of intersectional labour practices.  ...

Diagnosis of a Planetary Condition

This post by Mél Hogan and Susan Cahill is part of a series on Sustainable Academia—in cooperation with the Next Generation Action Team (NEXTGATe) of the European Society for Environmental History—in which contributors reflect on the conditions of historians in Europe and beyond (especially those in early career stages), introduce visions for the field, and suggest concrete action in order to build more inclusive and supportive academic environments.